The city clerk for Mexico Beach abruptly resigned Tuesday evening during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council.


The city clerk for Mexico Beach abruptly resigned Tuesday evening during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council.



In resigning, Deborah McLeod said there was one person on the City Council that she "had a hard time dealing with," but did not provide any names.



“This is what’s best for the city, and for me,” said an emotional McLeod after she submitted her letter of resignation.



The City Clerk was recognized by Mayor Al Cathey for her contributions over the years.



“Thank you for your dedication. You’ll be missed by everyone,” he said.



Stressing the importance of having the City Clerk position staffed, Cathey made a successful motion to fill the vacant spot as soon as possible.



Demolition of the old City Hall building to prepare for the new construct was also a topic at Tuesday’s meeting.



Brian Cathey of Cathey Construction noted that floor plans for the new building have been complete since December and are pending final review and approval. Once the plans have been approved by the insurance companies, they’ll be able to release a finalized cost for the project.



The city must still obtain stormwater permits before demolition on the current City Hall building can begin, though Brian Cathey noted that they are on track to break ground for the new building as early as April.



“It’s moving along really well,” said Mayor Cathey of the ongoing water project.



The estimated date of completion is September of this year.



Department of Public Safety Official, Chief Glenn Norris announced plans to subscribe to the “Code Red” Emergency Communication service which will allow local residents to sign up to receive important notifications via phone or email.



Mayor Cathey praised the system, and the benefits it would provide to the community. A scenario was proposed that would allow residents in very specific areas could be pinpointed and notified if future water problems arose.



“It’s a well-documented and reliable system,” said Cathey.



The subscription service will cost the city $2,000 a year.