The Gulf County and Mexico Beach Domestic Violence Task Force has landed on a winning formula.

 

The Gulf County and Mexico Beach Domestic Violence Task Force has landed on a winning formula.

For the second consecutive year, the Task Force turned its annual fundraising event into a family-friendly affair at the El Governor Motel and for a second-straight year the rewards were bountiful.

The annual fundraising, held late last month, turned around more than $9,000 to the Task Force once minor expenses for putting on the event were subtracted.

That is up slightly from last year, and well ahead of funds raised during prior events, which in the past revolved around “Ladies Night” events.

“Without the community and that support we couldn’t help the victims were are able to help,” said Pam Martin, executive director of the Gulf County and Mexico Beach Domestic Violence Task Force.

The day included a fashion show and silent and live auctions and attracted more than 200 people, Martin said.

Rockin’ Randall, Charlie Black and Jerry Arhelger provided live music throiugh the afternoon, with Neysa Wilkins also singing.

Wylie Petty of the El Governor Motel was awarded a plaque for hosting the event the last two years.

“I think the venue definitely helped us, but also that we turned it into a family event,” Martin said.

Piggly Wiggl supplied the Boston Butts for eating and the Wewahitchka Woman’s Club assisted with the event, raised money and also supplied auction items.

Martin sent out thanks to everybody, and there would have been more than 115 names if listed, who donated, participated, volunteered and, in whatever way, supported the Task Force and the event.

“I just want to thank everybody who helped, we could have not have done it without them,” Martin said. “If I started listed them all by name, I would certainly forget somebody.”

The Task Force remains busy, Martin said.

On average, the Task Force provides assistance and outreach for 10-15 new cases each and every month.

“The numbers are not going down,” she said. “They don’t go away.”