There seems little question that if he could remain healthy, Roman Quinn would be a factor in the outfield for the rebuilding Philadelphia Phillies.

 

 

There seems little question that if he could remain healthy, Roman Quinn would be a factor in the outfield for the rebuilding Philadelphia Phillies.

But that continues to be a big if.

Quinn, the Port St. Joe native now playing for Triple A Lehigh Valley, was slated to see noted surgeon James Andrews this week for a second opinion on his injured left elbow, according to Philly.com.

Quinn injured his elbow sliding into third base nearly two weeks ago.

An initial MRI showed an injury to one of the main ligaments in the elbow; any silver lining is that it is Quinn’s non-throwing arm, according to TheGoodPhight.com.

His stint on the disabled list is the just the latest, and as several media outlets noted, Quinn began this year in Triple A, instead of the Phillies outfield after a late 2016 call-up, due the club’s concerns about his injury history.

In 15 games with the Phillies last season before being, yes, hurt, Quinn carried a slash line (batting average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage) of .263/.373/.333 in 69 trips to the plate, hitting four doubles, driving in six runs and stealing five bases on six attempts.

In 401 minor league games since being drafted in the second round in the 2011 amateur player draft, Quinn’s slash line is .276/.353/.400 with 56 doubles, 32 triples, 25 home runs, 133 RBIs and 276 runs in roughly 1,500 at-bats.

He has also stolen 169 bases.

Quinn was even making a recent push for another call-up to the major leagues.

After a slow start this season, he was hitting .313 over the 20 games prior to the injury.

At the time he was hurt, Quinn was hitting. .274/.344/.389 with eight doubles, three triples, two home run and 10 stolen bases in 14 attempts.

But since his first professional season, Quinn has missed time due to strained obliques (the injury that ended his major league season in 2016), a strained quadriceps, an Achilles tear and fractured wrist.

He has never played more than 88 games in a season and has yet to make it through an entire season healthy since he was drafted.

As John Stolnis wrote for TheGoodPhight.com, that injury history has undermined the growth of a 24-year-old with talent.

“His speed is electric. He makes good contact. He generally doesn’t strike out a ton … and he has surprising pop for a (5-foot-10, 170-pound) center-fielder… But the dude just cannot stay on the field.”