Sounds like a horror movie, right?

But it’s really happening -- parasitic bloodsucking worms found in Burmese pythons that have been invading the Everglades are traveling up north and killing native snakes in Central Florida, a new study shows.

Not only have the pythons spread deadly parasites to native snake species in South Florida, they are also responsible for overeating and destroying many of the Everglades’ animal population.

Concern over the parasites began last August after researchers at Stetson University in DeLand found a venomous pygmy rattlesnake with parasitic worms crawling out of its mouth, according to a news release.

The study says the bloodsucking worms may be the culprit behind the snake deaths.

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The parasites were never found in pygmy snakes before -- but now Steson researchers are finding the pesky invaders more than 100 miles away from the pythons they usually infect in South Florida, Orlando Weekly reports.

Stetson faculty and students discovered parasites living in the lungs and trachea of three dead pygmy snakes from Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge in DeLeon Springs during a dissection.

"It's a nasty situation because the pygmy rattlesnakes haven't evolved or developed defenses against the parasite," said Terence Farrell, a Stetson biology professor who is the study's senior research author, in a statement.

Scientists have no idea if the parasite could become a “nationwide problem in a few years,” according to Farrell.

Laura Jazmin Tolliver is a digital reporter for GateHouse Media Group’s Florida team, based in West Palm Beach, Fla. Jaz’s stories, which run across digital, print and video platforms, are syndicated across the 22 Florida newspaper markets.